The Increasing Significance of Global Environmental History: The Anthropocene and Sustainability

The Increasing Significance of Global Environmental History: The Anthropocene and Sustainability

As part of our New Directions in World History series, hosts Dean Pinos and Paul Horton interview John McNeill of Georgetown University on how the study of environmental history in a global context provides historians the context to better understand impacts of human behavior on sustainability.

John McNeill was born and raised in Chicago and remains passionately devoted to the professional sports teams of the Windy City. He earned, or at any rate was awarded, a B.A. from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. from Duke University. Since 1985 he has cheerfully served two masters, as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department at Georgetown. From 2003 until 2006 he held the Cinco Hermanos Chair in Environmental and International Affairs, until his appointment as University Professor. He teaches world history, environmental history, and international history at Georgetown; and writes books, and directs Ph.D. students, mainly in environmental history. He has served as president of both the American Society for Environmental History (2011-13) and the American Historical Association (2019), and is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Academia Europaea.

Presenter:
John McNeill, Georgetown University
Hosts: Dean Pinos and Paul Horton